» Professional awards

Prizes and competitions

 

  • Semi-finalist in The American Prize in Composition – Chamber Music, Professional Division – the only Asian-born composer to be honored in this category (2013)

  • Sole winner of Bowdoin International Music Festival Composition Competition - the first Chinese-born composer to be awarded first prize (2012)

  • Winner of American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Commission Competition (2010)

  • Honorable mention at the Earplay Donald Aird Memorial International Composers Competition – the only composer from mainland China to be honored at this award (2009)

  • The only winner from mainland China in a field of 142 at the inaugural San Francisco International Center for the Arts Illuminations and Reflections competition for 21st Century Composition (2009)

  • Placed first in the 17th Annual California State University Los Angeles Symposium on Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity, and second in the 23rd Annual CSULA statewide research competition (2009)

  • Winner of University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory Music Composition Prize (2005)

  • National Award (highest mention) from Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing (2002, 2001)

  • Viacom Sumner Redstone Award (2002) and Diligence Student Award (2001) from Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing
    Tanhainu




    Tanhainu

 

Scholarships and funding

    Tanhainu
  • Music Merit Award and travel grant from New England Conservatory of Music (2010)

  • Scholarship from Accent 10 – University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music summer program for chamber music (2010)

  • Awarded California State University Los Angeles Friend of Music scholarship (2008, 2007) and travel grant (2008)

  • Chancellor’s Non-Resident Award from University of Missouri-Kansas City (2006, 2005, 2004)

  • Scholarship from Bowdoin International Music Festival (2006)

  • Scholarship from Composition, Theory, and Musicology Department at UKMC Conservatory of Music and Dance (2006, 2005, 2004)

  • Scholarship from American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (2005)

  • Grant from Women’s Council Graduate Assistance Fund at UMKC (2005)

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» Music festivals and conferences

2013, 2009-08

» Freie Universität Berlin International Summer University, Germany

2012, 2010, 2007-06

» Bowdoin International Music Festival, Brunswick, ME

2012

» Summer Composition Institute, Harvard Music Dept colloquia and concerts, Boston, MA

2011

» New England Conservatory Composers Lab Ensemble Inaugural Workshop, Boston

2010

» The Cortona Sessions for New Music, Cortona, Italy
» Accent10 – the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music Summer Program of Chamber Music, Cincinnati, OH
» National Association of Composers USA National Annual Conference, Portland, OR
» International Joint Conference on Latin-American Music and on Modern Music, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX

2009

» Nevada Encounters of New Music Symposium, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV
» Illuminations and Reflections: First Annual Symposium on Music in the 21st Century, International Center for the Arts, San Francisco State University

2005

» California Summer Music Festival, San Francisco, CA

2002

» The Second Annual Central Conservatory Music Festival, Beijing, China

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» Music and paper presentations

June 2013

Freie Universität Berlin International Summer University, Germany
“Hunting Fireflies” – percussion duet for xylophone, vibraphone, marimba, and cymbals
Presented and discussed during composition master class

July 2012

Bowdoin International Music Festival, Brunswick, ME
“Dance of Differing Languages” – for flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon
“Sound of Wind” – for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano
Presented and discussed during composition master class

March 2011

New England Conservatory Composers Lab Ensemble Inaugural Workshop, Boston
“Memory of Venice” – for soprano saxophone, violin, and piano
Presented and discussed during composition workshop

May 2010

New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, MA
“Beethoven’s Piano Sonata in C minor, Op. 10, No.1 , Movement 1 – Timeline Diagram of
Thematic and Tonal Designs”

March 2010

National Association of Composers USA National Annual Conference, Portland, OR
“The Natural Sights and Sounds Flowing in Sound of Wind

May 2009

23rd Annual CSULA statewide research competition, Los Angeles, CA
“The Natural Sights and Sounds Flowing in Sound of Wind

February 2009

17th Annual CSULA Symposium on Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity
“The Natural Sights and Sounds Flowing in Sound of Wind



Good morning, Ladies and Gentlemen. My name is Tan Hainu. I am going to introduce my quintet Sound of Wind. I began this piece right after finishing a string trio, which emptied my mind but left me anxious to start anew. One sunrise, perhaps five in the morning, I lay on my bed, looked out my opened second floor window, and thought of how I might sketch my next chamber piece. I looked at a linden tree just outside until my eyes grew tired and I shut them. Suddenly, I heard the shivering of the leaves and felt a cold wind softly caress my face. My eyes opened and all of the leaves crescendoed. (Vocally imitates a sound.) I arose and exclaimed, “That is the opening of my piece!” (Music example played.) Instantly I heard the strings – violin and cello – create shivering leaves through tremolo, or a wavering of notes. As a counterpoint, the woodwinds – flute and clarinet – create the flowing melody of the wind. My vision had them sharing a private conversation. Even though all the leaves were green, in my mind’s eye I turned them into picturesque colors. Different combinations of instruments through timbre would create the varied tinges, which is why the melody of the wind transmutes across the distinct orchestration. This is the whole texture of the first movement, “Wind.” Sometimes the texture is thick when many instruments play, sometimes thin when there is a solo, but the whole movement progresses swiftly, as if looking through a kaleidoscope: color and shape cascade endlessly. In the end, the wind departs, demonstrated by a fleeting tremolo in the piano. (Music example played.) Thereafter, that initial wind freed my imagination for the entire piece.

I saw the wind crossing mountains and arriving at a spring. The rolling stream and wind dance a waltz, (vocally imitates a sound), which gives rise to an easy smile. (Music example played.) The dancing melody comes from the violin, and later translates to the alto flute. To imitate water dripping, the cello plays pizzicato, accompanied by a staccato piano. The cello’s pizzicato dissolves into broken chords on the piano and finally into its higher registers; the wind flies away. (Music example played.)

A raven glides in on a low G on the violin, casting its ominous shadow over the universe. (Music example played.) A dark wind ruffles the feathers of our sitting raven. One by one instruments create several intervals and makes the texture thicker. The rhythm becomes tighter as countless ravens circle until a flock of raven is formed. Musically, a weak dynamic becomes emboldened. The flapping of millions of wings aggravates the turbid gale. (Music example played.) After the quintet stays on one chord, the cello shows the approach of a hunter. He raises his rifle and peers through the scope. Strings play in a high register above the piano’s oppressive chords. The contrasting registers mimic the hopeless raven in his meteoric fall. Our raven lies bleeding. (Music example played.)

In the moon’s twilight, the strings whisper harmonics to evoke a sensitive and melancholic love. A yearning sigh kisses the window-pane in successive arpeggios up the piano ivory. (Music example played.) The woodwinds weave the piano and strings into a gossamer curtain enveloping naked cuddling lovers. Longer arpeggios lead to short asphyxiated ones: the sorrowful breath flickering. The quintet laments as one. Chords falter and a weeping staccato elicits a single teardrop. The silence of midnight wind unveils timeless love. (Music example played.)

Spring awakes; sunshine and summer wind pushes a tree swing in a jazz rhythm. A toddler is helped up and he feels the exhilarating wind whip his face as mom and dad help him reach new heights. Compound rhythms demonstrate the swing’s movement against the wind. The meter is 4/4, but I counter that with a series of triplets and quintuplets as the boy undulates by himself. His lack of experience causes him to fall. The child looks at his boo-boo and, with two forceful notes from the clarinet, utters, “Uh oh!” (Music example played.)

The enveloping wind and passion ignites a flame of hope. Mixing themes from previous movements elevates the climax of the entire piece, such as the harmonies and pizzicatos of the strings, the staccato and arpeggio fragments from the piano, and the triplets and quintuplets of the rhythm. The heat, our energy, emboldens us to greater heights. At this point the strings and wind play a cacophony of quick notes while the piano strikes massive chords in a contrasting rhythm to emulate percussion. The sound of wind yells: life eternal. (Music example played.) In its echo, we hear the opening wind whisper again. (Music example played.)

I use the Expressionist gesture and technique in this composition to present the aesthetic feelings of purity and beauty. On the surface each small movement is about the natural scenery of flowing wind. However, philosophically I create music as a metaphor to depict human life consisting of emotions such as happiness, sadness, love, cruelty, passion, and loneliness. Through the creating of Sound of Wind, I was able to weather down to my true self. By using my own language of music, I endeavor to hold the mirror up to nature and inspire audiences around the world.

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Music and paper presentations (cont.)

October 2008

Society of Composers Incorporated Student National Conference, Muncie, IN
“The Conflict and Fusion of Japanese and Arabian Traditional Music Cultures”

April 2008

California State University Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
“Overlapping Playing Skill System for String Solo”

March 2007

California State University Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
 “The Conflict and Fusion of Japanese and Arabian Traditional Music Cultures”

November 2005

University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO
“Music of India” – with Hindi monk musicians playing on traditional instruments

January 2005

University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO
“The Conflict and Fusion of Asian Traditional Music Cultures”

December 2004

University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO
“Music of Middle East”

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» Professional memberships


  • Society of Composers Incorporated (2005-date)

  • American Composers Forum (2007-date)

  • National Association of Composers USA (2010-date)

  • Broadcast Music Incorporated (2012-date)

  • Boston New Music Initiative Incorporated (2013-date)

Tanhainu

» References are available on request

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» Short Biography (150 words)

Hainu Tan is a Chinese-born composer whose work fuses a multitude of global aesthetic styles to contribute to a responsible globalization of civilizations through universal love and music. Her journey includes a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Central conservatory of Music in Beijing, a Master of Music degree from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, and summer semesters studying at the Freie Universität Berlin under Professor Samuel Adler of The Juilliard School of Music. Her dream is to discover her own identity in the universe according to God's original specific purpose, respond to God's unique calling for her life, and let Jesus Christ's love and light shine forth throughout the whole world. Through her music, she hopes to convey the way, truth, and life to poor, hungry, weak, sick, disabled, mentally ill, brokenhearted, desperate, dispossessed, marginalized, unemployed, and homeless people around the world. Learn more at: www.tanhainu.com.

» Long Biography (2,719 words)

"Music is love in search of a word," once intoned 19th century American musician and poet Sidney Clopton Lanier. Since her birth in China's Zigong, Sichuan Province (baptized in Boston, Massachusetts), Chinese-born composer, pianist, and teacher Hainu Tan has tirelessly been driven by a similar idea: music bonds the world in ways that other forms of language cannot. From Chinese cadenced and colorful languages, Indian, Arabian and African dynamic and orchestic polyrhythms, America's magnificent majesty and freedom, liberty, equality, justice spirit, German and Austrian precise expression and multidimensional features, and French and Italian romantic and artistic imageries, her music exists at the interstices of Chinese and Western society, and recognizes the need to positively contribute to the global conversation.

Indeed, Hainu Tan's music is a cornucopia of hybridity and inclusivity and has been commended as "descriptive and highly innovative" by the Portland Press Herald. Her work is categorized into three periods: Christ Jesus period (–present–2013–), wind period (2012–2006), and tea period (2008–1994). The compositions in Hainu Tan's Christ Jesus period reflect her Christian faith. Here she responds to God's unique calling and plan for her life. Through her music, she hopes to convey the way, truth, life, resurrection, faith, peace, blessings, and healing to the poor and the rich, the hungry and the well-fed, children and adults, the elderly and youth, the weak and the strong, the sick and the healthy, the physically disabled and abled, the mentally ill and well, those who are alone and those in a community, the desperate and the hopeful, the brokenhearted and the joyful, the dispossessed and people with five generations under one roof, the marginalized and the recognized, the unemployed and the promoted, the homeless and people with safe and happy homes, who are from all around the world.

The compositions in Hainu Tan's wind period reflect the United States and European influences. Here she combines disparate aesthetic styles, including: Abstractionism, Aestheticism, Expressionism, and Impressionism. Some examples of her pieces are: The Dream of Berlin for String Trio, Sound of Wind for Flute, Clarinet, Violin, Cello and Piano, and Dance of Differing Languages for Woodwind Quartet, all influenced by the Second Vienna School and the European musical tradition she was exposed to during her residency in Germany. These three pieces reflect her musical aesthetics through the wide contrast of bright and melancholy harmonies. The Dream of Berlin contains aggressive passages and is full of vitality as is reflected in the astonishing and looming art and architecture that surrounded her in Berlin. She used the Expressionist gesture and technique in her Sound of Wind to present aesthetic feelings of purity and beauty along with the mystical sights and sounds that flow in nature. On the surface, each small movement is about the natural scenery of flowing wind. However, philosophically she created music as a metaphor to depict human life consisting of various emotions. Through Sound of Wind, she held the mirror up to nature and inspire audiences around the world. Dance of Differing Languages demonstrates her gorgeous sense of pitch and harmonic color; the piece describes people who are speaking different languages at the same time, while singing and dancing together. This exemplifies the integration of cultures and nations under the banner of peace.

The compositions in Hainu Tan's tea period reflect her Eastern characteristics and use the natural dramatics of various Asian languages. The form of her Four-Voice Fugue for Clarinet, Marimba, Vibraphone, Xylophone, Glockenspiel, Piano and Violin, incorporates an Eastern theme where Western Fugue form brings counterpoint to Eastern tradition. The second movement of her Echoing Colorful Clouds and Mystic Footprints of India for orchestra brings in the traditional barbaric dance rhythm of India thickening the Indian beat through the orchestration technique. Hainu Tan's Two-Bird Fugue for Solo Piano is based on Bach’s philosophy, and also incorporates Chinese "just intonation" and Arabian 24 equal temperament. Two-Bird Fugue introduces the vertical minor second chord into the horizontal 12 equal temperament, and in doing so, it weakens the 12 equal temperament. Hainu Tan’s Flowing Water for Solo Cello reflects Eastern aesthetic philosophy of art which demands purity and free-flowing thought for never-ending inspiration.

While Hainu Tan's journey includes having achieved a GPA of 1.0 in Music Composition under Professor Samuel Adler of The Juilliard School of Music at the Freie Universität Berlin International Summer University for three years – the best possible grade in the German system, which is given for outstanding performance, a Master of Music degree from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, a Bachelor of Arts degree from China's only national music academy – the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, as well as university teaching assistant positions and countless awards, it began at the tender age of three when her family moved from China's Sichuan Province to China's Guangdong Province. While most children were playing games or watching television, Hainu Tan felt a deep affinity for music and began playing piano at age 4. At age 6, she received a violin training and only a short time later began on-stage performances. Hainu Tan was exhilarated by the connection that the audience experienced with her music, a connection that empirically solidified her intuitive understanding of music's unifying importance.

Hainu Tan is described as kind-hearted, compassionate, creative, humble, diligent, and encouraging. She believes genuine artists dedicate their being to art from deep in their essential core. She believes that authentic musical innovation is the product of composers who create their own musical language and strive toward new musical technique. It is in the striving that God's glory and inspiration takes form. At the age of 8, Hainu Tan began such striving when she succeeded in creating her first piano work – a piano capriccio. After she started professionally learning the Chinese traditional instrument erhu at age 11 at the Xinghai Conservatory of Music's middle school, she followed her intuition and began a period of autodidacticism: She started teaching herself many other Chinese traditional instruments including pipa, guzheng, and xiao. However, she was not satisfied with merely playing other composers’ works, so at the age of 12 she shifted her focus to composition. Living in a dormitory room where electricity has been shut off at 11:00 PM, she composed music in the hallways until sunrise. These efforts proved to be a good foundation for her later middle and high school music composition studies at the Xinghai Conservatory of Music in Guangzhou. It was ultimately through this childhood and adolescent dedication to music that Hainu Tan developed her foundational aesthetic belief that harmony, counterpoint, musical form, and orchestration are crucial to composition.

After graduating from the Xinghai Conservatory of Music, Hainu Tan continued her academic training by entering the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing. It was here that her adolescent strivings blossomed into a full borne passion. At this institution Hainu Tan was introduced to and became profoundly inspired by global music culture. Today, her greatest influences include: Antonio Vivaldi, Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann, Felix Mendelssohn, Richard Wagner, Johannes Brahms, Richard Strauss, Claude Debussy, Maurice Ravel, Béla Bartók, Paul Hindemith, Arnold Schoenberg, Anton Webern, Alban Berg, Walter Piston, and Aaron Copland. In 2003, Hainu Tan earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in music composition at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, the only institution in Academies of Fine Arts in China and the only key institution of higher learning supervised directly under the Ministry of Education of the State Council among all academies of arts in China.

Attaining a deep appreciation for Western composition, as well as attaining a substantial academic foundation, empowered and inspired Hainu Tan to venture outside her homeland. Since she moved to the United States in 2004, she has received an astounding thirty-three awards and scholarships, presented compositions at eighteen music festivals and conferences, and produced twelve music-paper presentations.

Hainu Tan's work gives equal credence to the color of the harmony and pitch, polyphony and clarity of the counterpoint and rhythm; the varied timbre combination of the orchestration; and the mellifluence and coherence of form. She focuses on the overall framework of the entire piece as well as the careful depiction of the detailed phrases. Eastern philosophy believes everything has qi which is an active principle forming part of any living thing, both animate and inanimate objects. Qi is frequently translated as "life energy", "life force", or "energy flow". This reflects her philosophy of art which, like music, demands purity, free-flowing thought, for never-ending inspiration. Hainu Tan sees beauty in flowing water, not only with her eyes, but in her heart and mind, and in her music. Beauty is the result of the spirit. Composition theories serve the content and soul of music, further helping her develop her precise and refined, bold and flowing, elegant and flaming style.

Since graduating from the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, Hainu Tan has studied under famous German-born American composer and conductor Samuel Adler of The Juilliard School of Music; at the International Summer University of Freie Universität Berlin (2013, 2009, 2008), one of the most distinguished universities in Europe and one of nine German top-universities to win in the German Universities Excellence Initiative; and at the great American Bowdoin International Music Festival (2012, 2010, 2006), a festival that showcases the world's best classical music in one of the world's most beautiful settings. Professor Adler complimented her insight into music, the spirit of her innovation, her indomitable work ethnic, and even conducted the premiere of her chamber works. Hainu Tan earned her Master of Music degree in music composition at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston in 2011, one of the top ten music schools and the oldest conservatory in the United States. Here she received the NEC Music Merit Award for her musical excellence.

Hainu Tan's life also includes significant teaching experience. She taught music composition, music theory, ear training, and world music at California State University, Los Angeles (2007-2009) and the University of Missouri-Kansas City (2004-2006), with expertise in music composition, harmony and counterpoint, music theory and analysis, instrumentation and orchestration, musical style analysis, music history and literature, world and folk music. She is also active as a professional pianist and piano teacher with over 20 years of teaching experience.

Hainu Tan is currently affiliated with the Society of Composers Incorporated, the American Composers Forum, the National Association of Composers USA, the Broadcast Music Incorporated, and the Boston New Music Initiative Incorporated. Her catalogue includes operas, symphonies, string quartets, concertos, orchestral music, chamber music, solo piano, choral music, and songs. Her compositions have been premiered in many excellent international music festivals and conferences, including Freie Universität Berlin International Summer Institution (2013, 2009, 2008), Bowdoin International Music Festival in Maine (2012, 2010, 2007, 2006), New England Conservatory Composers Lab Ensemble workshop in Boston (2011), Cortona Sessions for New Music in Italy (2010), Accent10 New Music Festival at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music (2010), National Association of Composers USA National Conference in Oregon (2010), International Joint Conference on Latin American Music and on Modern Music in Texas (2010), Nevada Encounters of New Music in Las Vegas (2009), Symposium on Music in the 21st Century at the San Francisco International Center for the Arts (2009), Society of Composers National Conference in Indiana (2008), California Summer Music Festival (2005), Music Festival of the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing (2002), and at other venues in North America, Europe, Asia, and South Africa.

Tanhainu

Hainu Tan has also received awards and honors from many organizations. She was the only Asian-born composer that has been honored in composer semi-finalists of the 2013 The American Prize in Composition—Chamber Music—Professional Division, the sole winner and the first Chinese-born composer that has been awarded the 2012 Bowdoin International Music Festival Composition Competition Prize, and the only mainland Chinese winner of the 2009 inaugural San Francisco International Center for the Arts Illuminations and Reflections: Classical Music in the 21st Century International Composition Competition. Other awards include those from the 2010 American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Commission Competition, the 2009 Earplay Donald Aird Memorial International Composers Competition, the 2009 California State University Statewide Research Competition, the 2009 California State University Los Angeles Scholarly Presentation Competition, the 2005 University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory Composition Department Prize, the 2002-01 National Award and the 2002 Viacom Sumner Redstone Award and the 2001 Diligence Student Award from Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing.

Hainu Tan has been interviewed and her biography, accomplishments, and photos have been noted in both English and Chinese media outlets such as the Portland Press Herald, Bowdoin International Music Festival Press Releases, California State University Los Angeles News Release and Spotlight, The Monthly E-Newsletter of The College of Arts and Letters at California State University Los Angeles, Pith Music Online Magazine for Adorno Ensemble, the best world journal Chinese Daily News in Los Angeles, Los Angeles English and Chinese American commercial radio station KWRM 1370 AM, International Talent Magazine in China, Chinese Music Education Commerce Cooperation Alliance, China Musicology Network, and many other magazines, newspapers, and websites throughout the United States and China.

As one of a small number of Chinese born composers who live in the United States and are currently active in international composition competitions, music festivals, and conferences, Hainu Tan recognizes the importance of her role as a human being who is created in the image of God. Her dream is to discover her own identity in the universe according to God's original specific purpose, respond to God's unique calling and plan for her life, and let God's love and light shines all over the world. God wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth. "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all people are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. ... And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor." – Thomas Jefferson's Declaration of Independence, as revised by Congress, 4 July 1776. Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. Hainu Tan was born into and raised for music and music infiltrates her heart, soul, mind, and strength. There is no fear in love. But God's perfect love drives out fear, because fear has to do with punishment. The one who fears is not made perfect in love. "We love because God first loved us. One of my greatest desires is the peaceful coexistence of people all over the world. I hope in the future human society will gradually be integrated into one family: everyone keeps a pure heart to truly understand and care for one another and build each other up by pursuing kindness, goodness, gentleness, justice, righteousness, holiness, hope, love, joy, peace, patience, faithfulness, and self-control," she said in reflecting on her life's work. Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. As it is written: “What no eye has seen, what no ear has heard, and what no human mind has conceived” — the things God has prepared for those who love Him — these are the things God has revealed to us by His Spirit. The Spirit searches all things, even the deep things of God. In view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—I in them and You in me and I in You and You in them and they in us—rejoice with those who rejoice; mourn with those who mourn—Hainu Tan hopes her music conveys truth, faith, peace, blessings, and healing to the weak and the strong, the poor and the rich, the blind and the sighted people around the world. Ultimately, her use of the natural tone and expression of Eastern language, couples with Western classical music and instrumentation, contributes to such a responsible globalization of civilizations through the universal love and language of music.

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